ForEvolve

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Introduction to C# variables

A beginner guide to programming with .NET 5 and C#

Introduction to C# variables

In this article, we explore variables. What they are, how to create them, and how to use them. Variables are one of the most important elements of a program, making it dynamic. Of course, there is more to variables than what we can cover in a single article; this is only the beginning.

This article is part of a learn programming series where you need no prior knowledge of programming. If you want to learn how to program and want to learn it using .NET/C#, this is the right place. I suggest reading the whole series in order, starting with Creating your first .NET/C# program, but that’s not mandatory.

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Creating your first .NET/C# program

A beginner guide to programming with .NET 5 and C#

Creating your first .NET/C# program

This article is the first of a learn programming series where you need no prior knowledge of programming. If you want to learn how to program and want to learn it using .NET/C#, this is the right place.

The first step of coding is to create a program. The program could be a simple console or a more complex application (web, mobile, game, etc.). To get started, we will create a console application, which is the simplest type of program that we can make. The good news is that most of the topics covered in this series are reusable across all types of programs.

Furthermore, .NET and C# allow you to create a wide variety of programs and target most markets, from web to mobile to smart TVs. I believe this is a good choice of technology to start with.

Beforehand, let’s look at the prerequisites.

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Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

Officially Published

Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

That’s official today, my book, An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide, is published; no more preordering! I’m thrilled to share this with you, and I hope you will love it. What a journey it was; I’m telling you!

But are you ready to begin your SOLID adventure into architectural principles, design patterns, .NET 5, and C# and learn about the following topics?

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Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

What's inside?

Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

Are you wondering what’s An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide is all about? Here I’ll list as much information as possible, from the highlights to the journey, passing by the list of patterns, architectural styles, and other stuff covered in the book.

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Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

The story behind the book

Book: An Atypical ASP.NET Core 5 Design Patterns Guide

During the summer of 2018, I began writing a book outline with Packt. At first, the goal was a 320-350 pages hands-on book about ASP.NET Core design patterns. Two years and a half later, we have 750+ pages. I can say that I learned many things during that period and that writing a book is way different from what I initially thought.

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Speed up your builds to up to 375% and watch for changes for an even faster dev cycle using this workaround on WSL2/Ubuntu

Using Jekyll, from Windows (Workaround 2)

Speed up your builds to up to 375% and watch for changes for an even faster dev cycle using this workaround on WSL2/Ubuntu

In this article, we explore how to use VS Code on Windows and use the Linux file system to watch for changes in an improved dev workflow that I described recently in the first article about this subject.

Craig Loewen tweeted me a comment that lead to this even better solution, fixing the same problem and fixing the only drawback that I found. Good thing that one of my 2020 resolution is to use Twitter more!

That said, we still use a Jekyll project, Windows 10, WSL2, Ubuntu 18.04, and Visual Studio Code. We still can apply the same technique to webpack, gulp, or any projects that require watching the file system for changes. We still benefit from a significant speed boost when running commands, like build, of up to 375% (and maybe more)! But we also get all of the VS Code tooling to work (like the Git).

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Speed up your builds to up to 375% and watch for changes for an even faster dev cycle using this workaround on WSL2/Ubuntu

Using Jekyll, from WSL/Linux (Workaround 1)

Speed up your builds to up to 375% and watch for changes for an even faster dev cycle using this workaround on WSL2/Ubuntu

In this article, we explore a workaround to watch for changes using a Jekyll project, Windows 10, WSL2, Ubuntu 18.04, and Visual Studio Code. We can apply the same technique to webpack, gulp, or any projects that require watching the file system for changes. Moreover, I noticed a significant speed boost when running commands, like build, of up to 375% on the Linux file system directly.

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How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

Infrastructure as code

How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

I’ve got a good idea from a reader, and I decided to move forward with it: Infrastructure as code.

In this “article” (if I can name it that), I give you the YAML code that you can use to automatically create the build definition by adding a .vsts-ci.yml file to your Jekyll website.

The cool thing about the “infrastructure as code” mindset is the fact that you can manage your infrastructure as if it was any other code. So you can use Git, VS Code or any other coding tool you like. It can also facilitate collaboration, and it does facilitate reusability (and in our case: sharing).

Unfortunately, only the build definition can be shared this way right now. However, Azure does support the deployment of infrastructure as code. You can create Azure resources using ARM templates. Sadly, at the time of this writing, Azure does not support “Static Website (preview)” in the ARM, so I can’t give you that code.

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How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

Part 3: The VSTS Release

How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

Now that we have a Blob Storage container set up for static website delivery, we need to deploy our Jekyll website there.

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How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

Part 2: Create Azure Blob Storage, and configure static website

How to deploy and host a Jekyll website in Azure blob storage using a VSTS continuous deployment pipeline

Lets recap: we have a Jekyll website saved in VSTS/Git, with a build that starts automatically each time someone pushes code to the master branch.

From there we need to deploy our website in the cloud! However before automating that, we need to create some resources in Azure. To do so, let’s use the Azure portal.

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